Finding Out Fonts Identity Conveniently: WhatTheFont Reviewed

As a tool provided by MyFonts, a USA-based company, WhatTheFont works automatically after users upload or drop an image. Once the text inside is detected, users can click the font they want. Easy, simple, and straightforward, right? However, we have more things you probably will find interesting. Here’s our review about WhatTheFont.

An Extensive Collection of Over 133,000 Fonts

 

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Utilizing deep learning to explore WhatTheFont’s collection of more than 133,000 font styles, the platform helps users find the best match for the searched fonts. Users can even try it with connected scripts or pictures of several fonts.

When I tried out this platform, I noticed that the best results often come after I uploaded a good quality sample image focusing on one or two fonts. Submitting a poor quality or pixelated sample image still generates results, although it’s hardly relevant and reliable. The texts are also better horizontal.

For the best results, I recommend submitting a sample image with

  • a single font
  • consistent letter size (minimally 100-pixels tall)
  • separate individual letters (not touching or conjoined)
  • a text as horizontal as possible
  • less than 2 megabytes

If your picture is a little too big, there’s an option to draw a manual crop box, too. However, be sure that you only draw it around one line of text.

Instead of using an image, users can also opt for a URL. It only works if the URL directly leads to the font image you want, not a webpage or even an entire website.

Another option for users to utilize WhatTheFont is by installing their mobile app. Users can identify fonts with their camera, similarly convenient like going to the website.

If there are still issues after you use the methods above or if the results are unfavourable, WhatTheForum provides a designated forum where everyone can post their sample image and ask anyone that possibly knows the answer to your question. Don’t worry; the forum is full of experts. It’s a human-powered alternative, and there’s always a good chance someone knows the font you’re curious about and helps you identify it.

Language Supports

 

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We know it’s not all Latin alphabet and numeric out there. Sometimes we can get curious about mysterious, beautiful fonts that aren’t Latin, and you might wonder if WhatTheFont supports this or not.

Starting on the page https://www.myfonts.com/languages/, there are several specific languages that allow users to apply a few search filters in searching their mystery fonts. Using the ( – ) ( + ) buttons on the right, users can remove or add filters for more relevant results.

Main Features:

  • A collection of more than 133,000 font styles
  • Interactive upload section
  • Mobile app available on the App Store and Google Play Store

So, what fonts will you create on this platform? Let us what you think after using WhatTheFont after reading our review!